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. a shocking death. a united states ambassador in libya dead today. the obama administration taking steps now this hour to beef up security at embassies around the world. after this veteran diplomat christopher stevens along with three of his american staffers were murdered by a mob in benghazi, libya. the attack yesterday was apparently triggered by a film, a film produced by an american by the name of sam basil. considered by many to be highly offensive to islam. again, a film. these murders taking place in a country that the united states helped to liberate from the dictator moammar gadhafi and a mob attacked the embassy in cairo, egypt, yesterday. climbing the embassy walls. tearing down and ripping apart the united states flag. it's unclear if the attacks were koord natded or plans to con side with the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks here in america. but moments ago, our president obama spoke out about these killings. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we're working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats. i've alwa
that the united states had nothing to do with the youtube video that seems to have sparked the violent protests. >> this video is disgusting and reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose, to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. but as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. >> egypt is where the latest violence against the u.s. started. egypt may be where the u.s. faces its biggest challenges. you've got angry crowds protesting for a third day over a film that insults islam. now, demonstrates threw mocks and molotov cocktails, pushed through the barbed wire fencing outside the embassy in cairo. police responded by firing tear gas. ian lee is join ugs from the egyptian capital. ian, this is three days with these kind of demonstrations. first of all, do we expect that on friday, a day of prayer, it's going to be much, much bigger and more violent? >> reporter: well, it's definitely going to be a lot bigger. the muslim brotherhood is calling fo
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
different images here, offering comfort to the families, saying that the united states despite the images of violence will remain engaged around the world, that justice will be done. but also in the case of each of these men, making the point that they essentially fell on a battlefield, in service of the country, and in service of their friends. and, of course, this is what the fallen do, don't they? you learn so many times through the years that when men and women fight in battle, they fight for each other. and these men were fighting for libya, they were fighting for the people of libya, and the president, i think, made it very clear in his message, he wanted to sound that theme, that they served for a reason for this country and for countries around the world, that this is the symbol of u.s. diplomacy. >> barbara, let's listen to that now. >> four americans, four patriots, they loved this country and they chose to serve it and served it well. they had a mission, and they believed in it. they knew the danger, and they accepted it. they didn't simply embrace the american ideal, they live
in cairo issued a statement that seemed to apologize for anti-muslim activity in the united states. that prompted the white house to quickly release another statement through an administration official saying that cairo embassy remarks were, quote, not cleared. secretary of clinton issued her own statement, condemning the attacks under the strongest possible terms, but that was not quick enough for the romney camp to blasted the obama saying it's disgraceful that the obama administration's first response was not to condemn attacks on our diplomatic missions. and then from the obama campaign, we are shocked that at a time when the united states of america is confronting the tragic death of one of our diplomatic officers in libya, governor romney would choose to launch a political attack. end quote. newt gingrich appeared on cnn this morning and blasted president obama. >> when the american flag was torn down and destroyed, an american ambasdor and three other americans are killed, my reaction is not to be pleasant and caring of those tearing down our flag and insulting o iassau coun
-u.s. protests in cairo. the secretary of state hillary clinton has denounced the violence against the united states. >> but as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. >> let's turn now to cnn's ben wedeman in cairo. 224 people injured so far? >> reporter: yes. that's right. and in fact, the number is probably likely to rise. right now, i'm hearing a lot of shouting and there were just a moment ago a lot of teargas being fired in the street. right next to the american embassy. and this is really been going on all day long. and what we have seen in the last hour is that the security forces have pulled back closer to the area immediately around the american embassy. now, we had a chance to speak with some of those protest earls. many of them blaming directly president obama for this current uproar. >> translator: our demand is that president barack obama appears and makes an official apology to all islamic nations. that is our right. we also want the tape burned and al
of pressure when it comes to this. not only from the united states, but also from its own people. now, whether these people that are detained are really involved in the attack or have links to this extremist group is something that we'll have to see and see what kind of reaction we see from the extremists too. >> do we have any idea if they're related or affirmative actionated with al qaeda? there's a lot of talk about that yesterday, the possibility that that was the organization. >> not much has been revealed by the government by this group, but what we do know, suzanne, is this is not an isolated incident. over the past few months we have seen an uptick in similar attacks targeting western interests. the u.s. consulate itself was targeted in an attack back in june when a bomb detonated outside the embassy. those attacks taken place in benghazi was targeted by a extremist group, it was called the brigades. this is a true al qaeda group. we also do know that there are groups with links direct links to al qaeda that operate in the eastern part of the country. >> what is the security situation
of the united states, speaking directly to them with their faces, their words coming out and saying this was not u.s. government policy. that's the truth. >> i think it's not an apology. let's talk about how the people in the united states may feel. you know the people there well, but many people in the u.s. don't understand why a cheap internet movie that was made here in the u.s., not in pakistan, not -- how would you explain this cultural divide? >> we take very personally the importance of our protections for free speech, but in pakistan and elsewhere in the world it's beyond the law. it's beyond a constitutional. they are -- i have always found -- i have served for many muslim countries, muslim majority countries, and i have found the people to be very gracious, very welcoming, very accepting of my differences as a foreigner, and they expect and would like to be shown greater respect, and they find that this kind of video is highly disrespectful of them and it's offensive. now, that does not, as it did in libya, in any way excuse the violence or taking of civilian lives, the bu
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
and a stern warning. the israeli prime min sister warning the united states to establish a clear line that iran cannot cross with the nuclear program. this morning we ask what is that line and what happens if it's crossed? >>> front page scandal. the royal family trying to stop topless pictures of kate from spreading. an italian magazine owned by the former prime minister silvio berlusconi is publishing a 38-page special edition. it's hitting newsstands now. >> a replacement ref replaced before the kickoff. side judge brian stropolo booted for openly being a saints fan. he posted pictures of himself in saints gearal gating. monday morning quarterback this one. one. "newsroom" begins right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin this hour with muslim outrage and new flare-ups of anti-american violence. one flash point, kabul, afghanistan. crowds of protesters turn on police when they try to block their march toward the u.s. embassy. at least 15 officers are hurt and their vehicles set on fire. in ind
on the united states consulate in benghazi. arwa damon got inside that building. it's now burned out and has the most complete picture that she's about to bring us of the violence from that night and the warning that came days before. >> amid the ash, soot, and debr debris, remnants of a life that was. and what it meant to those stationed here. scrawled on this sheet, libya is so important. traces of blood stain the walls. what is now a blackened ruin was a pleasant compound in an upscale benghazi neighborhood. libyan officials say tuesday night's attack was planned by islamist militants and quickly overwhelmed the libyan and american guards. the compound's first line of defense easily breached. according to one of the libyan guards that was stationed at the gate, armed with only a radio, the assault happened sim simultaneously from three different directions. he said he initially heard chanting growing increasingly louder and suddenly, the gun fire, the rocket propelled grenades and other heavy machine gun fire all began attacking the compound. he's so terrified of repercussions he's refusi
. and they quite openly state that they can take on any other brigade, any other unit that the government chooses to throw in their direction to try to force them to lay down their weapons. what the government wants to see is growing support from the international community. when it comes to the bare basics of institution building from security forces, to a justice system, but also, if necessary, things like training, things like quipping, but also things like trying to establish a nationalistic sense amongst these individuals and not a sense of each unit for its own. >> i know there's a sense there, unlike iraq, afghanistan, international interests, let's say, waned after gadhafi fell. arwa, thanks for your reporting as always. >>> more on what we're working for "newsroom international." what to know what happens going on behind the scenes in north korea? we asked kim jong-il's former sushi hef. the most famous rapper in italy, italian rapper. what it takes to break into the american music scene.ni ! [ male announcer ] isn't always the one you plan to take. whoa, check it out. hey baby goat... n
against the united states. but the protests in libya, tunisia, and egypt are smaller in size and lower in volume. a mob started to form near the u.s. embassy in cairo today. but security forces broke it up. a u.s.-made film considered to be insulting the islam was among the protesters this week. >>> and pope benedict xvi calling for religious freedom in the middle east. crowds in lebanon cheered for the pope on the second day of his visit there. the pope praised lebanon as an example of how christians and muslims can work together, marriages between christians and muslims are not uncommon there. but the area has seen violence. there was a protest in tripoli and lebanon. scenes of carnage, in aleppo, syria today. 11 people were killed across the country. at the time, the president met with the envoy to discuss how to end the violence. he accused other nations of funding the terrorism, which he says are responsible for bloodshed. >>> and more rallies in chicago today, by striking teachers, including a march in the streets this afternoon. the two sides reaching a tentative deal, the offic
the pledge of allegiance and just listen. >> i -- >> i pledge of allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with lib libber ti and justice for all. >> it was pretty amazing and a lot of folks in the convention hall crying at that moment. wassermann schultz, herself, her dear friend has also had her own battles as well. she had breast canceand survived breast cancer, and you see the two of them embracing to help her get off of the stage. a magical moment last night, and of course, all night enk waiting to hear from the president, but the speech that really revved up the crowd. watch this. >> all across america, auto is back, manufacturing is rebounding. why? you know why. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. i was talking to my best friend. i told her i wasn't feeling like myself... i had pain in my pelvic area... and bleeding that wasn't norm
in the classroom come monday morning. the taliban say they are responsible for the deaths of two united states marines. it happened in helmand province. a joint u.s. and british base where britain's prince harry is stationed. taliban have threatened to capture or kill harry during taliban. >>> new graphic video today out of syria. at least 145 people were killed across the country today. that's according to an opposition group. syria's president says he's committed to resolving the crisis as long as peace efforts are conducted in neutrality sxindens. he met today with a new international envoy from the united nations. and arab league. special envoy for the u.n. refugee agency, angelina jolie is speaking out about the syrian crisis. >> i share in everyone's concerns about the winter approaching. with the violence and conflict showing no signs of easing up and the numbers growing as people are crossing the borders and -- it is a very large concern for all of us and i hope we can all work together to make sure that, of course, you know, to be blunt, nobody freezes to death in this very, very frig
everyone, the taliban says they're responsible for the deaths of two united states marines, happening in helmand province. >>> and overnight, an assault at a joint u.s.-british base, where prince harry is stationed. the taliban has threatened to capture or kill prince harry. all of the taliban fighters except one were killed. >>> throughout the arab world, voices are still raised in anger against the united states. but the protests in libya, tunisia, and egypt are smaller in size and lower in volume. a mob started to form near the u.s. embassy in cairo today. but security forces broke it up. a u.s.-made film considered to be insulting the islam was among the protesters this week. >>> and pope benedict xvi calling for religious freedom in the middle east. crowds in lebanon cheered for the pope on the second day of his visit there. the pope praised lebanon as an example of how christians and muslims can work together, marriages between christians and muslims are not uncommon there. but the area has seen violence. there was a protest in tripoli and lebanon. scenes of carnage, in aleppo,
that the united states government had nothing to do with this video, and i believe its message must be rejected by all who respect our common humanity. it is an insult not only to muslims but to america as well, for as the city outside these walls makes clear, we are a country that's welcomed people of every race and every faith. we are home to muslims who worship across our country. we not only respect the freedom of religion, we have laws that protect individuals from being harmed because of how they look or what they believe. >> our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is live at the united nations. she joins us now. listening to that speech, it began with a mention of chris stevens, it ended with a mention of chris stevens and it's not lost on anyone watching that the president has two major audiences. he's got an international audience clearly, and he's got a domestic audience during this election. was he able to navigate appropriately between the two with the remarks he actually chose? >> reporter: well, it will depend who you ask, ashleigh, and i think that he within his parame
the region the united states shut many diplomatic facilities because friday prayers often fueled mob rage. some of the ugliest violence, thou though, is in pakistan. in peshawar, protesters set fire to two movie theaters. joining us live from islamabad with more, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. a national holiday, a day to show your love for the approvest muhammad. it turned out to be a day where many pakistanis showed their anger against america, demonstrations in every major city in pakistan and sometimes it got very violent. one news van driver in the city of peshawar shot and killed. here in the capital of islamabad, protests are dying down. here is what it looked like earlier today. friday prayers have just concluded. what we're seeing are some of the largest and most intense protests yet here in pakistan. now what you see over there are shipping containers. police are using them to block off the path to the diplomatic enclave. that's where the foreign embassies are, u.s. embassy, french embassy. now what you seem to have here is some people urging protesters to rush
. and rehabilitation programs the world over, including in the united states, often fail. the hope is that you the get one or two of these guys out of a whole host of them actually not to return to the battlefield. that's something of a win. but the united states has recognized this policy of repatriating them, that they may return to the battlefield. >> fran, you were just there. you were a close friend of ambassador stevens. did he ever say anything to you like we're hearing in these reports, that he believed he was on an al qaeda hit list. he was very concerned about the deteriorating security situation in benghazi? >> you know, it was august 29th, that morning ambassador stevens and i had breakfast together. we had a whole conversation because i expressed concern about the growing rise in michigans in tripoli. -- militias in tripoli. the growing number east of benghazi, growing in numbers and their arms capability there. he was clearly concerned about that. but he suggested to me at some point to go to benghazi, to see for myself. so i think he understood very well the increasing concern about ext
safely to us. i can never lose hope. >> please help me get home. 33 years of service to the united states deserves something. >> what gives you hope when you look at that video and see how he looks? >> i know when he looks determined, and he looked very determined to make it home safe and sound. >> her husband has missed walking one of his daughters down the aisle. another daughter's wedding is in february. >> his closet is still full of his clothes and i know it won't fit him anymore. and i haven't even touched his dresser. every morning i'm reminded that the nightmare continues. >> if he is able to see this what do you want the say directly to him? >> we will never, ever, ever stop looking for you. i miss you every day. love you. >> reporter: the u.s. has offered no new information about where levinson is and who's holding him. i spoke to a source with knowledge of the investigation who says "there is every reason to believe that levinson is alive and well." >>> police have found the body of a retired firefighter in nebraska. charlie dowd was traveling to visit family by amtrak when he
of the ambassador of the united states. >>> in teheran, protests outside of the swiss embassy which represents the u.s. since washington does not have diplomatic relations with iran. and also, american warships and u.s. marines are headed for libya as we speak. just a short while ago we learned identity of one more of the americans who were killed in libya. a person speaking for the family says she glenn dohertyf massachusetts. also, political fallout is building in the country over mitt romney's quick attack over president and the way that the american administration handled this crisis. cnn has reporters right across the globe throughout the middle east and we have handle on every s aspect and angle of this story, and we are life in every location. we will start right now with the anti-u.s. protests in yemen. one important note here sh, ye is a key ally in the fight against al qaeda in the arabian peninsula which has been a massive, massive problem of late. hakeem al wa ssri, is our journalist on the ground there. can you hear me? are you there? >> yes. protesters are decreasing and force forced t
came across the plaza, senators and their staff streaming down the steps here, the united states senate, not knowing where to go. and that is one of the many frightening, very frightening things, not only did we not know what was happening but there was no place for these incredibly important people to go, no plan at the time. so we came right here, which is across from the capitol, we trd to plug in our camera so they could get a shot of whatever was going to happen or happening here and it was really that the moment, we're talking about minutes here, suzanne, that members of the capitol police corps started screaming, run, run for your life. i believe you were at the white house, to have somebody who is in uniform tell you to run for your life, there's probably nothing more frightening than that. and the reason is because they were hearing in their ear that a plane was missing in the air and of course it was 93 and they didn't know if it was heading for the white house or the capitol or what. so that's why they told us to leave. i want to show you the scene, people were running across
, but the president of the united states is not quite yet. this is urbandale, iowa. this is a big rally and this will be the president's seventh stop in iowa leading up to presidential election this november. all of this as he kicks off the warm-up act before the dnc gets under way this week in charlotte. we'll take you back to urbandale, iowa, as soon as the president arrives. >>> all right. a check of some of the news happening right now overseas. in central afghanistan two suicide bombers have targeted an afghan military base. the attacks killed 13 people, among the dead, a child, two women and four policemen. the taliban has claimed responsibility. >>> in south africa, protests are breaking out over the arrest of 270 platinum mine workers charged with the murder of 34 of their colleagues, but those workers were actually shot by police. south africa's justice minister is now demanding answers. >> after 50 years, the german inventor of the drug thalidomide has apologized to its victims. the drug taken by pregnant women caused babies to be born with deformed limbs. the head of a surviv
. >> 33 years of service to the united states deserves something. >> iran's president has repeatedly turned down meeting requests from levinsoavvilevinsn the past. >>> a man jumped into the bronx zoo because of a desire to be with the tigers. he jumped from the monorail yesterday into the pit where a tiger bit him. rescuers helped move the tiger away from the man. >> is the tiger going to be put down? >> no, absolutely -- as i said, the tiger did nothing wrong in this, did nothing wrong in this case at all. >> 25-year-old man is in stable condition with a broken shoulder, rib, pelvis, and ankle. he will be charged with trespassing. >>> the filmmaker behind that anti-muslim movie that has caused outrage in several countries is said to be in hiding, and he may need the stay there. a pakistani minister says he'll pay for his death. he says he feels it's his duty as a muslim to do that, and he is inviting two of his enemies to carry out the assassination. >> i have announced today anyone who murders him, i will reward with 100,000 u.s. dollars. i invite the taliban and al qaeda brothers
chiefs, secretary of defense and, of course, the president of the united states. but, you know, you were talking about alison before about the years that have passed and how things are changing. secretary of defense panetta said he wanted to remind everyone not to forget the truth. 11 years later there are still 77,000 u.s. troops fighting in afghanistan out on the front line in danger every day. panetta make a plea one more time for people not to forget. life moves on. it has been 11 years. but here at the pentagon, pausing not just to remember those who lost their lives here, but looking ahead, really, to what is happen iing with the troops still out on the front line, carol. >> tell us the changes inside the pentagon after, you know, they rebuild. didn't they put a special chapel in and a special room? >> yeah. you know, the pentagon has changed quite a bit. if you weren't here 11 years ago, it all looks very normal. but there are a lot of changes. there is a memorial chapel inside the building, just on the other side of the wall where the memorial is that you're looking at, where the
it was a completely different story. there is real tension here between afghanistan and the united states, so u.s. holding on to something like 34 highly valued detainees. these being senior members of the taliban, of the network that just a couple of days ago was listed as a terrorist organization and of al qaeda. these are the detainees that the u.s. does not want to hand over to the afghans just yet. the reason being is they're concerned they'll end up in the criminal justice system and possibly be free, whether it's through political interference or corruption. that is the major concern, suzanne. >> and where do those prisoners go? where do they physically take them? where are they being held by the american officials? >> reporter: well, the americans actually have a part of baghram prison. they have their own section. the prisoners are still being held will. now, it's worth noting, suzanne, that an agreement was signed back in march between president karzai and the united states about handing over control, but as of march the u.s. has arrested something, like, 1,600 prisoners. they have be
with that entity, then of course anyone who is bearing arms with that entity is fair game for the united states of america. >> reporter: there are places where the two candidates differ. first over the guantanamo bay facility, and the use of waterboarding, where a detainee is made to feel as if he is drowning. >> despite the promise to return the american people to the moral high ground, and promising to close the facility--on a question of torture, you have to know what it is to know where the candidates stand. while both have said they're opposed to the use of torture, romney has so far refused to characterize waterboarding as torture. >> i don't think it's productive for the president of the united states to lay out a list of what is specifically referred to as torture. >> romney's lack of a specific explanation worries security experts. >> to say that he won't allow torture, but he doesn't want to refer to-woe. >> waterboarding is torture. it's contrary to america's traditions, it's contrary to our ideals, that's not who we are. >> reporter: a recent poll suggests that likely candidates --
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 149 (some duplicates have been removed)